2016 Schedule

VENUE DIRECTIONS

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 8

1:00-1:30 Registration

1:30-1:45 Welcome/Summit Introductions
William Ross, The Collaborative, Co-Chair; Brooks Pierce, Of Counsel

1:45-5:00 Plenary/Panel Presentations (Break Between 3:15-3:30)

Opportunities for New Partnerships through Citizen Science
Jay Benforado, US EPA, Office of Research and Development, Chief Innovation Officer

Motivations for Conducting Citizen Science and Community Engaged Research in the Context of Environmental Justice
Symma Finn, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Population Health Branch, Health Science Administrator

Community Owned and Managed Research: Model for Compliance and Measurable Outcomes
Omega Wilson, West End Revitalization Association, President
Sacoby Wilson, Community Engagement, Environmental Justice, and Health (CEEJH), Director; University of Maryland-College Park, School of Public Health, Assistant Professor

Panel Discussion: Decision-makers, project leaders and audience engaging in dialogue regarding what criteria/threshold must be achieved to use citizen science
Moderator: Brian Southwell, RTI International, Center for Communication Science, Program Director
Four Plenary Speakers
Bryan Brice, Law Offices of Bryan Brice, Of Counsel
Monica Ramirez-Andreotta, University of Arizona, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Assistant Professor
TBA, NC Department of Environmental Quality

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9

8:00-8:30 Registration/Continental Breakfast

8:30-9:00 Citizen Science and Community Engaged Research at NIEHS: Looking Back and Moving Forward
Linda S. Birnbaum, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and National Toxicology Program, Director

9:00-11:30 Work Group Sessions (attendees will be assigned to specific groups)
Sessions present an opportunity for attendees to engage in discussion, to explore issues and perspectives, and to address the goals of the workshop, including the development of recommendations for practitioners. Case studies will be used as examples to spur discussion. Understand what each group needs for engagement and building a communication continuum and translation across all three groups.

Conduct of Citizen Science and Community Engaged Research Work Group
Explore issues related to the definition, design, and conduct of citizen science and community engaged research including education and training, collection and handling of samples and data, integration and access points for traditional researchers and citizen scientists and co-investigation models, obstacles to success and best practices, potential best use scenarios for solving environmental health problems, funding sources and others.

Facilitators: Grant Parkins/Sarah Yelton, UNC Chapel Hill, Institute for the Environment
Caren Cooper, NC State, Forestry and Environmental Resources Department, Associate Professor; NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Biodiversity Research Lab, Assistant Head
Chip Hughes, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Worker Education and Training Program, Program Director
Amanda Kaufman, US EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Physical Scientist

Data and Technology Work Group
Explore issues related to the rapid development of technology and tools, including social media, open source data platforms, wearable sensors and data collection devices, GIS and mapping tools, and others that may facilitate citizen science and community engaged research, as well as problems they may present.

Facilitators: Neasha Graves/Dana Haine, UNC Chapel Hill, Institute for the Environment
Kim Anderson, Oregon State, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology Department, Professor
Gretchen Gehrke, Public Laboratory for Open Technology & Science, Data Quality and Advocacy Steward
Damian Shea, NC State, Environmental Toxicology Department, Professor
Ron Williams, US EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Project Lead-Emerging Technologies

Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues Work Group
Explore issues including publication, validation, and acceptance of research results by decision makers; privacy concerns, confidentiality specific EH issues such as causality and timeframe from exposure to outcome, communication of research results to participants and affected communities, data and sample ownership and reuse, and ensuring the benefits of research accrue to appropriate parties, including through non-traditional incentive and award systems.

Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues
Facilitators: Kathleen Gray/Andrew George, UNC Chapel Hill, Institute for the Environment
Sally Darney, Environmental Health Perspectives, Editor-in-Chief
Christine Goforth, NC Museum of Natural Sciences, Citizen Science, Head
Lea Shanley, UNC Chapel Hill, South Big Data Innovation Hub, Co-Executive Director

11:30-12:30 First Interim Work Group Progress Reports/Opportunity for Coordination

12:30-1:15 Lunch

1:15-3:45 Work Group Sessions

3:45-4:45 Final Interim Work Group Progress Reports/Opportunity for Coordination

4:45-5:00 Closing Summary Remarks/Adjournment
Liam O’Fallon, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Population Health Branch, Health Science Specialist

Summit Supporters


Environmental Protection Agency
http://www.epa.gov/


RTI International
http://www.rti.org/


National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
http://www.niehs.nih.gov/


Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University
https://nicholas.duke.edu


North Carolina State University
http://www.ncsu.edu/


UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health
http://www.sph.unc.edu/


MDB, Inc.
http://www.michaeldbaker.com/


Kenan Institute for Engineering, Technology & Science
https://kenan.ncsu.edu


Social & Scientific Systems, Inc.
http://www.s-3.com


Integrated Laboratory Systems
http://www.ils-inc.com


North Carolina Biotechnology Center
http://www.ncbiotech.org/


VisionPoint Marketing
http://www.visionpointmarketing.com